Plathonic

Ask me anything   Submit   Interests include but are not limited to philosophy, art, film, anthropology, literature, archaeology, photography, linguistics, sociology, psychology, physics, astronomy


Brigitte Bardot and Michel Piccoli in Jean-Luc Godard’s Le Mepris, 1964.
Brigitte Bardot and Michel Piccoli in Jean-Luc Godard’s Le Mepris, 1964.

(Source: cinyma)

— 9 months ago with 146 notes
"Benditos sean los que no tienen memoria porque ellos tendrán el paraíso"
— 9 months ago with 7957 notes

The Blue Planet: firefly squid.

(Source: dear-monday, via criticalforest)

— 9 months ago with 11351 notes
"

I’d like to break a real taboo at this point, and raise a few questions that the pro-sex people consistently evade. Where do these sadistic and masochistic fantasies come from? To borrow from Simone de Beauvoir, are they born or are they made? Are they really agents of our liberation? If we are aroused by them, does it automatically follow that we are empowered by them?

To begin to answer these questions, we have to look beyond the fantasies themselves to the culture in which they develop. It is not just coincidence that they imitate the violence men do to women and girls. Think about the implications for our sexuality of the following statistics: More than a third of us were sexually abused as children (Russell, 1984). For many of us, our first sexual experience was a sexual assault. Forty-four percent of us will be raped (Russell, 1984). The environment in which we learn about and experience our bodies and sexuality is a world not of sexual freedom but of sexual force. Is it any surprise that it is often force that we eroticize? Sadistic and masochistic fantasies may be part of our sexuality, but they are no more our freedom than the culture of misogyny and sexual violence that engendered them.

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Dorchen Leidholdt, “When Women Defend Pornography” (via heteroglossia)

(Source: sisterresister, via formerlyfulviabambulanowonhiatu)

— 9 months ago with 2513 notes

tedx:

Four years ago, photographer Jimmy Nelson set off on a quest to visit and photograph 31 of the world’s unique tribes. He became enamored with learning about cultures so unlike his own — cultures he fears will soon die out — with traditions, rituals, and customs he believes all the world should know.

"I wanted to witness their time-honoured traditions, join in their rituals and discover how the rest of the world is threatening to change their way of life forever," he says in a mission statement for his project, Before They Pass Away.Most importantly, I wanted to create an ambitious aesthetic photographic document that would stand the test of time. A body of work that would be an irreplaceable ethnographic record of a fast disappearing world.”

In a high-energy, captivating talk at TEDxAmsterdam, Jimmy tells stories from this years-long project that has had him travel to the “edges of the world,” and taught him how to better understand the world, and the people, around him. Above, some of his work showcased in his talk, including his photos of the Samburu people, the Kazakhs, the Mursi, and the Rabari.

— 9 months ago with 793 notes

science-junkie:

The Strange Sarcophagi of the Chachapoya

By the time the Spanish arrived in Peru at the beginning of the 16th Century the Chachapoya people had already been subsumed in to the great Inca Empire.  Although they had resisted the Incas fiercely, the lands of these Warriors of the Clouds as they were known had been annexed and had been forced to adopt the customs and culture of their conquerors. Yet they left one thing behind – the strange sarcophagi in which they would bury their dead.

Read more

— 9 months ago with 1233 notes

a-golden-lasso-of-my-own:

Yay! Feminist Anthropology time!

Prehistoric Cave Prints Show Most Early Artists Were Women

I added the emphasis in bold, but the “that” was already italicized in the article, and it’s probably my favorite part. I love this article, although I’m not a huge fan of the fact that it’s considered so incredibly shocking and radical to imagine that women possibly participated in society 40,000 years ago.

In other awesome feminist anthropology news: it is now somewhat accepted that the venus sculptures, rather than being depictions of female beauty by male artists, were self-portraits by women looking down at their own bodies. The paleolithic figurines lose their distorted proportions and acquire representational realism if we understand that they are self-portraits created by women looking down at their own bodies. [UPDATE 10/21: Please see here for apology]

See also: This quote by Sandy Toksvig

When I was a student at Cambridge I remember an anthropology professor holding up a picture of a bone with 28 incisions carved in it. ‘This is often considered to be man’s first attempt at a calendar’ she explained. She paused as we dutifully wrote this down. ‘My question to you is this – what man needs to mark 28 days? I would suggest to you that this is woman’s first attempt at a calendar.’

It was a moment that changed my life. In that second I stopped to question almost everything I had been taught about the past. How often had I overlooked women’s contributions? How often had I sped past them as I learned of male achievement and men’s place in the history books? Then I read Rosalind Miles’s book The Women’s History of the World (recently republished as Who Cooked the Last Supper?) and I knew I needed to look again. History is full of fabulous females who have been systematically ignored, forgotten or simply written out of the records. They’re not all saints, they’re not all geniuses, but they do deserve remembering.

— 9 months ago with 27193 notes
savage-america:


It’s an arresting thought: “he was already our lord, our executioner, and our enemy.” (Clendinnen comments on the “desolate cadence” of these words). The ruler is not understood by the Mexica as normally benevolent though potentially dangerous; he is the enemy, and yet as the enemy he is indispensable. There is something profoundly alien in this thought, with its unsettling understanding of “legitimacy,” something I do not find anywhere in the classical Western tradition of political thought.

Abandoned Footnotes: Aztec Political Thought

savage-america:

It’s an arresting thought: “he was already our lord, our executioner, and our enemy.” (Clendinnen comments on the “desolate cadence” of these words). The ruler is not understood by the Mexica as normally benevolent though potentially dangerous; he is the enemy, and yet as the enemy he is indispensable. There is something profoundly alien in this thought, with its unsettling understanding of “legitimacy,” something I do not find anywhere in the classical Western tradition of political thought.

Abandoned Footnotes: Aztec Political Thought

— 9 months ago with 34 notes
scienceyoucanlove:

So who was throwing spears before humans? The discovery of 280,000-year-old stone-tipped spear remains in Ethiopia has two possible implications: that our species is much older than previously thought or, more likely, that a predecessor species was making tools long before Homo sapiens. Read more: http://bit.ly/1hIOC77 via Discovery News
source 

scienceyoucanlove:

So who was throwing spears before humans? The discovery of 280,000-year-old stone-tipped spear remains in Ethiopia has two possible implications: that our species is much older than previously thought or, more likely, that a predecessor species was making tools long before Homo sapiens. 

Read more: http://bit.ly/1hIOC77 via Discovery News

source 

— 9 months ago with 2515 notes